Libby Volunteer Fire Department Header Image

Our Locations

  • Station 1: 119 East 6th Street
  • Station 2: 180 River Run Lane N Hwy 37
  • Station 3: 38137 US Hwy 2 S

Contact Us

Make a difference, become part of our team!

Do you have what it takes to become a volunteer firefighter and provide a valuable service to Libby and the surrounding communities?

Our crew of 30 volunteers is always looking for aspiring men and women to protect the lives and properties of their neighbors in time of emergency. Please stop by our station located in downtown Libby to pick up an application and an information packet explaining the duties and requirements of becoming a Libby volunteer fire fighter.


Libby Volunteer Fire Department Logo
City of Libby Fire Department

The City of Libby Fire Department, located at 119 East 6th Street, provides emergency and non-emergency fire protection services to Libby residents and businesses. Meeting the need for a full-time professional fire department within the city limits, the main company, initially formed in 1911, built and established itself at this location beginning in 1980.

Fire Engine 30
1993 KME
1500 GPM Pump
750 Gallon Water Tank
1400′ of Hose
Seats up to Nine Firefighters
Fire Engine 6
1999 Spartan/E-One
1250 GPM Pump
1000 Gallon Water Tank
Fire Truck - Ladder Truck 1
1984 Simon-Duplex
1500 GPM Pump
400 Gallon Water Tank
75′ Ladder
Pre-piped Waterway to Platform
   for Aerial Water Discharge
Lincoln County Rural Fire District

Station 1

The Lincoln County Rural Fire District was formed in 1955 to provide better protection for the citizens living outside the city limits. Since 1964, this department has been housed in the same station as the City of Libby Volunteer Fire Department, co-existing as one professional, well-trained entity sharing manpower and equipment.

Fire Engine 9 (Added to our fleet spring 2015)
2014 Rosenbauer
1500 GPM Pump
1000 Gallon Water Tank
Fire Engine 7
2004 Ford F-550
70-35 GP Compressed Air Foam System (CAFS)
220 Gallon Water Tank/20 Gallon Foam
Water Tender 4 - Vacuum Tender
2004 Sterling
500 GPM Pump
3500 Gallon Water Tank
Water Tender 5 - Vacuum Tender
2007 International
250 GPM Pump
2500 Gallon Water Tank
Water Tender 6 - Vacuum Tender
2007 International
250 GPM Pump
2500 Gallon Water Tank
Command Center
1995 Chevrolet Utility and Communication Unit
Station 2

The department operates from a strategically located station situated at 330 River Run Lane North Hwy 37. Constructed in 2004, the department’s primary responsibility is to provide the highest quality of service protecting residents, property, and the environment from fire and other hazardous conditions.

Water Tender 3 - Vacuum Tender
1990 International
350 GPM Pump
3500 Gallon Water Tank
Water Tender 2
1980 International
350 GPM Pump
2100 Gallon Water Tank
Trash Pump 1
1983 Barnes Trash Pump
1500 GPM Pump
(6) 2.5″ Outlets
Fire Engine 4
1983 Pierce Dash
1500 GPM Pump
750 Gallon Water Tank
Station 3

The ultimate objective of this department, located at 38137 US Hwy 2 South, is to provide emergency firefighting operations and rescue resources for the residential, commercial, and industrial areas lying outside the southern edge of the city limits.

Fire Engine 5
1993 Simon-Duplex
1500 GPM Pump
1000 Gallon Water Tank
Water Tender 1 - Vacuum Tender
1995 Ford F-800
250 GPM Pump
1800 Gallon Water Tank
Decontamination Trailer
2008 Ameri-Can® Self-Contained Unit
Our Fire Apparatus Retired from Service
1973 International Fire Engine
1977 Ford 900
1932 Chevrolet Fire Truck
1954 Mack Model B Fire Truck
LVFD Fire Apparatus Facts

Each piece of equipment in the Libby Volunteer Fire Department’s “front line” fleet has a very specific assignment on an emergency. Below are brief descriptions of the apparatus.

A fire truck, also referred to as a ladder truck, is not only equipped with multiple ground ladders of varying length and applications, but also comes equipped with a very large hydraulically operated ladder. This “aerial ladder” is permanently housed on the unit and is used to gain access to fires occurring at great heights in structural settings. Some fire departments further extend their firefighting efforts by using aerial water towers to deploy an elevated master stream of water for defensive, surround-and-drown operations. It is also common for a fire truck to carry equipment for extrication and forcible entry purposes, and carry specialized tools for ventilation, emergency and rescue operations.

A fire engine, or “pumper” truck, is a triple capacity apparatus that provides not only transportation and access to a fire scene, but also provides firefighters with hundreds of feet of fire hose along with a water supply and the necessary equipment for a wide range of firefighting and rescue tasks. Typically, the fire engine may have several sufficient water sources available at the scene of a fire. The methods can include delivery from a public water supply via an easily accessible fire hydrant or simply utilizing an onboard water reservoir.

A water tender, which can also be known as a tanker truck, is a specialized firefighting appliance designed for drafting and transporting large volumes of water to a fire scene as an alternate water source for fire engines where hydrants are not readily available. Even though water tenders are insufficiently powered to fight fires, this vehicle is one of the most important units at a fire station providing water support for structural fires in areas with no other means of gaining a water supply.

An industrial strength trash pump is a portable device used for those applications where high solid content liquids such as mud and sludge or large pieces of debris replicating twigs and stones are encountered. Designed to meet the infiltration of such problematic waste, the apparatus remains durable under the harshest of conditions with continued ability to pump large amounts of water.